Will TMS Therapy allow me to stop taking the medication used to treat my condition(s)?


The decision to incorporate medications in a patient’s treatment plan is very individualized and usually requires coordination between the TMS physician and your prescribing behavioral health provider. Most patients receiving TMS take psychiatric medications before and after their treatment. There is indirect evidence that medications can increase the likelihood of responding to TMS and help sustain the benefits of TMS after treatment is complete, though more research is needed to confirm and clarify this idea.

There are some patients for whom medications are not tolerated or are not aligned with their treatment preferences. In these cases, patients can be successfully treated with TMS alone. To best tailor a treatment plan, we encourage a robust discussion with your providers to determine what is most appropriate for your unique circumstance.

Please be advised that the information presented here is for information purposes only and should not be considered medical advice. All patients are encouraged to discuss any issues or concerns they may have with their behavioral health providers.

Do you have any questions about TMS Therapy? Comment below.

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2 Comments
  1. Reply
    TCK

    Do you treat Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective disorders with TMS? I’ve read a recent article that was published on 09/07/17, that scientists have found a region in the brain where they believe hallucinations are coming from and with TMS, it can either lessen or improve the them. Is it painful?

    • Reply
      Greenbrook TMS

      Dear TCK:

      TMS Therapy has not received FDA clearance for the treatment of Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder at this time and we are not aware of any pending approval applications for these conditions. There is a fair amount of literature looking at treatment of these disorders with TMS, specifically targeting symptom subsets such as hallucinations or difficulty with organization or planning. While this early literature looks promising, there is more research that needs to be done before TMS is available as a mainstream modality.

      Please be advised that the information presented here is for information purposes only and should not be considered medical advice. All patients are encouraged to discuss any issues or concerns they may have with their behavioral health providers.

      Team Greenbrook TMS

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