All Posts in Category: TMS Therapy

Patients & Providers
Invited to Open House: Charlottesville Center
Thursday, July 28

Learn How TMS Therapy is Successfully Helping People with Depression

Greenbrook TMS NeuroHealth Centers invites Physicians and Interested People to an Info Session presented by William Sauvé, M.D., psychiatrist and Medical Director with Greenbrook TMS.  Learn how TMS Therapy is helping people struggling with Depression.  Dr. Sauvé will fully discuss TMS Therapy and answer any questions.

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Tysons Corner Open House: Thursday, April 28

YOU’RE INVITED TO THE TYSONS CORNER TMS NEUROHEALTH CENTERS OPEN HOUSE: THURSDAY, APRIL 28

Learn How TMS Therapy is Helping People with Depression

We invite you to join Dr. Geoffrey Grammar with TMS NeuroHealth Centers in an informational session about how TMS Therapy (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Therapy) is helping people diagnosed with Depression.  Dr. Grammer will fully discuss TMS Therapy and answer any questions.

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Columbia Open House: Thursday, April 28

YOU’RE INVITED TO THE COLUMBIA TMS NEUROHEALTH CENTERS OPEN HOUSE: THURSDAY, APRIL 28

Learn How TMS Therapy is Helping People with Depression

We invite you to join Dr. Hanita Chhabra with TMS NeuroHealth Centers in an informational session about how TMS Therapy (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Therapy) is helping people diagnosed with Depression.  Dr. Chhabra will fully discuss TMS Therapy and answer any questions.

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Comedian Neal Brennan Talks Depression and How TMS Therapy Helped

BrennanComedian Neal Brennan, co-creator of Comedy Central’s Chappelle’s Show, openly discussed his struggles with depression and his life-changing treatment with TMS Therapy in an interview for Slate Magazine’s podcast, The Gist with Mike Pesca.

Although Brennan refers to his depression as life dampening not life threatening, he has endured the illness as long as he can remember and has done several things to try and improve it.  Among the treatments include using “pretty much every medication you’ve heard of . . .”.

TMS Therapy is what finally made the difference for Brennan, and he explains how TMS Therapy was effective rather quickly and was also covered by his insurance. He said that those close to him noticed the positive changes in his demeanor, in addition to marked improvement in his creativity and productivity.  “I think I got more entertaining,” Brennan states with a laugh, adding that he’d “kill on stage 40% harder because I wasn’t sad, there was no heaviness to me.”

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Frequently Asked Questions About TMS Therapy

When other treatments may not be enough, physicians are prescribing Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Therapy (TMS Therapy) to treat depression. TMS Therapy is a safe and effective, FDA-cleared medical treatment for individuals diagnosed with depression that can be used in conjunction with medication or as a stand-alone treatment. It offers a non-invasive, non-systemic, and non-sedating in treating depression. TMS Therapy applies magnetic stimulation to specific areas of the brain involved in mood regulation- areas known to be underactive in people suffering with depression.

Common Patient Questions about their TMS Therapy

We have compiled several questions that patients have commonly asked TMS NeuroHealth Centers about their TMS Therapy treatment.  Whether you are a prospective patient or currently receiving TMS Therapy, we hope that you find our responses helpful.  It is important for you to personally consult with your treating physician regarding all questions that you have about your TMS Therapy treatment.

What is a TMS Therapy treatment session like?

While treatment varies by individual, a typical TMS Therapy treatment session is approximately 30-40 minutes. During treatment, patients relax in a treatment chair and remain awake and alert. The TMS Therapy device will deliver magnetic pulses to specific areas of the brain known to regulate mood. These pulses will feel like tapping on the scalp. The technician can make adjustments if the taping is uncomfortable. After a treatment session, patients can immediately return to their normal routine, including driving.  Click here to learn more about a Typical Treatment Session.

When will I feel better?

When will I feel better?

The acute phase of TMS Therapy ranges from 20-30 treatments over a 4-6 week period, and since every patient is different, response time varies as well. Some patients begin noticing a reduction in depressive symptoms after week two, while others begin to feel the benefits of therapy at week 4 or 5.

How can I tell if it’s working?

Initially, most patients notice positive changes in their behavior or mood, such as getting a better night’s sleep and feeling more rested in the morning, feeling “good” about themselves, being more social, feeling ready to go back to work, or making more independent decisions. All of these incremental changes indicate improvement, and should likely progress as treatment continues—and beyond.

Do I need to continue TMS Therapy after the acute phase?

While some patients may need maintenance therapy in managing their depression, a majority of patients will not. Variables such as a patient’s available support system, sleep patterns, diet, and exercise can all influence a patient’s recovery from a depressive episode. This is why TMS NeuroHealth Centers works with each patient to help them understand their situation, recognize potential triggers, identify a support system, and find the right combination of diet and exercise to help maintain their improved mood.

I’m feeling more depressed/anxious/having trouble sleeping after my TMS Therapy sessions. Is this normal?

Dips in mood and irregular sleep patterns are common among patients with depression, and while they are also common among new patients undergoing TMS Therapy, it’s important for you to speak with your TMS Therapy provider about any emotional or physical changes you experience throughout treatment.

My last TMS Therapy session is almost here—and I’m nervous about ending treatment. What should I do?

It is not uncommon for patients to report feeling nervous that their treatment is nearing completion, especially when having made improvement in their mood and quality of life. Seek guidance and support from your TMS Therapy provider, treating psychiatrist, therapist and loved ones to develop strategies that will help you navigate your feelings during this transitory period from the near ending of treatment to its conclusion and beyond. With guidance, it is also important to develop strategies that support a healthy quality of life post-treatment, such as regular exercise, healthy nutrition plan, psychotherapy (if indicated), and enriching social activities. Positive and activating lifestyle strategies will be of great benefit to you in maintaining your improvement or remission from depression.

If your current treatment is not enough, contact us at 1-855-333-4867 or visit TMS NeuroHealth Centers at www.tmsneuro.comWe provide a Free Consultation!

If you have questions about TMS Therapy or would like to share your experience, we welcome your input below.  Thank you for joining our conversation.

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The Link Between Chronic Pain and Depression

Human-With-Pain-DotsWe all experience pain of some kind from time to time – we stub our toe, pull a muscle, suffer with a headache, etc. But the American Chronic Pain Association estimates that one in three Americans (over 50 million people) suffers from some type of chronic pain1. Chronic pain is described as ongoing or recurrent pain which lasts beyond the usual course of acute illness or injury and adversely affects an individual’s well-being. Simply put, chronic pain is pain that continues when it should not. It may present as pain in the lower back, abdominal region, joints, neck, and even headaches, depending on the individual. Pain may be felt as aching, burning, shooting, or electrical and can affect sleep, cause fatigue and weaken the immune system.  Beyond the physical discomfort and stress upon the body, chronic pain also affects thought, mood and behavior, and can lead to isolation, immobility and drug dependence. If those symptoms sound familiar, it may be because there are many similarities and connections between chronic pain and depression.

Pain is a depressing experience, and depression can cause and/or intensify pain. In fact, over 66% of individuals diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) also suffer from chronic pain2, and depressed patients are three times more likely to develop chronic pain3.  Depression can cause a variety of physical symptoms even including affecting the body’s natural sleep cycle. This minimizes the amount of restorative sleep realized each night and exacerbates both chronic pain and depression symptoms. With 80% of depressed individuals complaining of insomnia4 or general body fatigue, it’s no surprise that this accumulation of stress on the body contributes to chronic pain.

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Antepartum Depression: Depression During Pregnancy

Antepartum DepressionPregnancy is one of life’s greatest journeys, and like any new quest, there brings change, unique challenge and discovery. The expecting mother and her partner will likely confront many additional commitments and unique challenges. From numerous doctor visits to added relationship strain and career stress, expecting couples learn to balance and adapt to these new demands. One of the more significant challenges during pregnancy is the physical and emotional impact of surging hormones which affects brain chemistry, sometimes causing a Major Depressive Disorder (MDD).1 There is growing awareness concerning Postpartum Depression- a period of about 6-weeks following the baby’s birth; however, there is practically no awareness and information being shared about the very real potential of suffering from depression during pregnancy- referred to as Antepartum Depression.

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You CAN cure Depression. Here’s the Proof.

Depressrace-winnerion is a very real condition that affects 1 in 10 Americans. Though some dealing with depression at various stages are able to treat and cure their symptoms using an Anti-Depressant medication and/or psychiatry, others are not as successful and end up dealing with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD). TRD occurs as a result of major depressive disorder which has occurred due to an unsuccessful attempt at treating depression through regular dosages of anti-depressant medication. A variation and/or combination of anti-depressants can be prescribed in this case to help counteract different symptoms in an attempt to treat the depression. Unfortunately, even these drastic measures can still show little to no success, leaving affected individuals feeling hopeless, defeated and even more anxious about their condition. The reality of the TRD can be quite hash, as those affect feel like there are no other options. In fact, one study suggests that anywhere from 29 to 46% of people (depending on the type of medication) fail to respond to treatment of an anti-depressant and 15% of these patients find no relief in multiple treatment trials[1].

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My Experience with TMS therapy

Author: Dragonfly Flight Diary [Facebook Admin]

 

I had a pretty rough summer in 2013.  It started in June 2013.  I was under a lot of high pressure from my work and I started slipping into my first full blown mania that I’ve experienced in probably about 8 or 9 years.  Prior it was just some rapid cycling and hypo-mania episodes but with long extended periods of depression that just never seemed to lift.

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