All Posts in Category: Depression

National Suicide Prevention Week, September 5 – 11, 2016

13108_AFSP_SPW_SocialGraphic_d1Whether you have personally lost a loved one to suicide or are struggling with depression and suicidal thoughts, you are not alone. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US, and every 1 in 5 people who die by suicide are veterans. But there is always hope. The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) is the leading national not-for-profit organization dedicated to understanding and preventing suicide, as well as the driving force behind National Suicide Prevention Week this September 5-11.

The best way to help yourself or a loved one is to learn about the suicide warning signs, risk factors and where to reach out for help.  Although about 75% of those who die by suicide exhibit some warning signs, it is important to be aware that some people do not show any signs at all. Recognizing the risk factors and warning signs of suicide is something we can all do to help prevent the loss of more lives, so take some time to familiarize yourself.

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Patients & Providers
Invited to Open House: Charlottesville Center
Thursday, July 28

Learn How TMS Therapy is Successfully Helping People with Depression

Greenbrook TMS NeuroHealth Centers invites Physicians and Interested People to an Info Session presented by William Sauvé, M.D., psychiatrist and Medical Director with Greenbrook TMS.  Learn how TMS Therapy is helping people struggling with Depression.  Dr. Sauvé will fully discuss TMS Therapy and answer any questions.

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Tysons Corner Open House: Thursday, April 28

YOU’RE INVITED TO THE TYSONS CORNER TMS NEUROHEALTH CENTERS OPEN HOUSE: THURSDAY, APRIL 28

Learn How TMS Therapy is Helping People with Depression

We invite you to join Dr. Geoffrey Grammar with TMS NeuroHealth Centers in an informational session about how TMS Therapy (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Therapy) is helping people diagnosed with Depression.  Dr. Grammer will fully discuss TMS Therapy and answer any questions.

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Columbia Open House: Thursday, April 28

YOU’RE INVITED TO THE COLUMBIA TMS NEUROHEALTH CENTERS OPEN HOUSE: THURSDAY, APRIL 28

Learn How TMS Therapy is Helping People with Depression

We invite you to join Dr. Hanita Chhabra with TMS NeuroHealth Centers in an informational session about how TMS Therapy (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Therapy) is helping people diagnosed with Depression.  Dr. Chhabra will fully discuss TMS Therapy and answer any questions.

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Comedian Neal Brennan Talks Depression and How TMS Therapy Helped

BrennanComedian Neal Brennan, co-creator of Comedy Central’s Chappelle’s Show, openly discussed his struggles with depression and his life-changing treatment with TMS Therapy in an interview for Slate Magazine’s podcast, The Gist with Mike Pesca.

Although Brennan refers to his depression as life dampening not life threatening, he has endured the illness as long as he can remember and has done several things to try and improve it.  Among the treatments include using “pretty much every medication you’ve heard of . . .”.

TMS Therapy is what finally made the difference for Brennan, and he explains how TMS Therapy was effective rather quickly and was also covered by his insurance. He said that those close to him noticed the positive changes in his demeanor, in addition to marked improvement in his creativity and productivity.  “I think I got more entertaining,” Brennan states with a laugh, adding that he’d “kill on stage 40% harder because I wasn’t sad, there was no heaviness to me.”

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Depression in Seasonal Affective Disorder

SAD3Often we may feel sluggish and low in energy during inclement weather; however, Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is more than feeling the occasional winter or rainy day blues.  Depression related to seasonal change can be severe and affects up to 6% of the general population.  Symptoms of SAD usually manifest in the fall and continue throughout the winter months; although, some people experience symptoms beginning in the spring or summer months.  In either situation, symptoms may begin mildly and become increasingly more severe as the season progresses.

Because Seasonal Affective Disorder is a subtype of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), people often suffer with the same symptoms as in depression.

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Mental Health Apps Help Track Mood and Symptoms

App Character EmotionsIndividuals enduring the symptoms of mental illness such as Anxiety, Depression, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and/or Bipolar Disorder, usually treat with psychotherapy, medications or a combination of the two. Often therapists recommend that patients’ journal their emotions, behaviors and symptoms on a consistent basis as a tool to gain greater insight of their condition.  Tracking patterns and potential triggers can be extremely helpful to patient and therapist in managing their disorder, including the critical advantage of early recognition of changes that might lead to an exacerbation of their condition. With greater insight and ability to act early, frequency of therapy sessions and/or medications can swiftly be modified to prevent a worsening of a patient’s condition. In addition, greater insight and journal feedback may encourage patients to seek immediate professional support during a crisis.

Daily journaling can sometimes feel cumbersome and time consuming, but with digital technology, this doesn’t have to be the case.  Software Developers are creating Apps to help those with mental disorders track and manage their symptoms. However, users should bear in mind that a psychiatric/medical background is not required to create a mental health app, and that this software should only be utilized as an additional part of a comprehensive treatment plan rather than a replacement for treatments such as prescription drugs, therapy, or TMS Therapy.

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Postpartum Depression in Men

PPD in MenTraditionally seen as a condition that only affects women, researchers estimate that 4 to 25 percent of men experience postpartum depression (or PPD) in the first two months following childbirth1, and that number increases to 68% over the first five years in fathers around age 252. Younger fathers were more at risk of developing paternal PPD if they lived in the same home as their children.

The scope of paternal PPD is still being studied as initial research used diagnostic criteria for maternal PPD to examine paternal PPD and more accurate tools are still being developed to test and measure symptoms of PPD in men. Thankfully, the range of studies and research has increased in the past few years as scientists work to understand PPD better in both men and women.

Depression symptoms in fathers are often similar to those experienced by women affected by PPD (e.g., general depressive symptoms such as sadness, fatigue, appetite changes, feelings of worthlessness, and/or negative feelings or lack of concern for themselves or the baby) but PPD can often present quite differently in men. Sudden outbursts of anger or irritability, impulsiveness (e.g., drinking too much, overeating, pursuing an affair), and immersing themselves in work can all be signs of PPD. Many men characterize these feelings as experiencing a sudden loss of control of their lives, which can lead to erratic behavior not commonly associated with depression.

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The Link Between Chronic Pain and Depression

Human-With-Pain-DotsWe all experience pain of some kind from time to time – we stub our toe, pull a muscle, suffer with a headache, etc. But the American Chronic Pain Association estimates that one in three Americans (over 50 million people) suffers from some type of chronic pain1. Chronic pain is described as ongoing or recurrent pain which lasts beyond the usual course of acute illness or injury and adversely affects an individual’s well-being. Simply put, chronic pain is pain that continues when it should not. It may present as pain in the lower back, abdominal region, joints, neck, and even headaches, depending on the individual. Pain may be felt as aching, burning, shooting, or electrical and can affect sleep, cause fatigue and weaken the immune system.  Beyond the physical discomfort and stress upon the body, chronic pain also affects thought, mood and behavior, and can lead to isolation, immobility and drug dependence. If those symptoms sound familiar, it may be because there are many similarities and connections between chronic pain and depression.

Pain is a depressing experience, and depression can cause and/or intensify pain. In fact, over 66% of individuals diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) also suffer from chronic pain2, and depressed patients are three times more likely to develop chronic pain3.  Depression can cause a variety of physical symptoms even including affecting the body’s natural sleep cycle. This minimizes the amount of restorative sleep realized each night and exacerbates both chronic pain and depression symptoms. With 80% of depressed individuals complaining of insomnia4 or general body fatigue, it’s no surprise that this accumulation of stress on the body contributes to chronic pain.

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National Mental Health Awareness Month 2015

Although a staggering one in five Americans have been diagnosed with a mental disorder(s)1, mental illness continues to be widely misunderstood, misrepresented, and subject to social stigma. Not surprisingly, the stigma associated with mental illness remains one of the biggest barriers preventing individuals from getting necessary treatment.

National Mental Health Awareness Month, observed throughout the month of May, is a campaign that strives to eliminate stigma, and encourage family members, friends and colleagues to support those diagnosed with mental illness in seeking out and receiving necessary medical treatment. Many organizations as well as leading media platforms participate in the campaign. This May, Discovery Life Channel in partnership with Bring Change 2 Mind, a non-profit organization dedicated to ending the stigma associated with mental illness, will air celebrity ambassadors calling for the end of mental illness discrimination as well as programming featuring various mental disorders.2

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